medicine

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I do not claim to be perfect but I DO claim to be a good doctor.  Not just a good psychiatrist.  Being a good doctor comes first.

One reason is that despite a lot of medical practice since graduation (I will admit to wincing a bit when I quote the figure in years–34) in multiple specialties, I still believe that taking care of other human beings and trying to help them through life is a sacred trust.  I actually believe that doing what I do the best I can is more important to whatever religious future my soul can scrape up than showing up at public worship.  Honest.

Another reason that I am a good doctor is that I am old enough that an amazing amount of bad medical things have happened to me.  Often before I knew better, they were the side effects of prescription drugs.  I now accept them only as temporary solutions.  I would rather dive into the world of alternative natural substances — which do work — if the practitioner is someone who knows what they are doing which I do. Read more on Cholesterol Lowering and Drugs…

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It is noble to teach the history and pharmacology of marijuana.  After practicing as a medical marijuana doctor and writing some for The NORML Women’s Alliance, and Ladybud (among others), my endorsement of marijuana and its constituents as nothing less than medicinal marvels is a matter of public record.

What is going on in Florida is something very, very different indeed.  Like the days of the Old West, when the gunslingers lived by the weapons on their holsters, now entrepreneurs are living on the cusp of an extraordinary wave of public opinion.  The pro-marijuana opinion in these United States has never been higher, and those who watch, comment upon, and work in the field seem to have little doubt that a generalized legalization of use is not far away.

Recreational and medical use are very different entities. Read more on Tampa Marijuana School…

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I was wearing my best pastel multicolor weave suit as I walked up the stairs of a drab gray Victorian mansion converted into a medical office on the outskirts of large mid-western city. It was a bit cool, early spring, and I had been through all of the other principal personalities in a fairly large and well respected neurosurgery department.  The emeritus chief of the department — older, semi-retired, wrote hunks of textbooks about 20 years before; was the last one I had to see.  Although nobody seemed wildly excited, I had “passed” the interviews to make it this far.

The Victorian mansion was the office building of the neurosurgical group that was the residency faculty.  I was ushered into a richly furnished Victorian style office with antimacassars and gigantic velvet wing-backed chairs.

The father-to-us-all type neurosurgeon spent over five minutes asking me about France and my passion for the brain before asking me if my period gave me any problems. Read more on Women In Science Sore And Soar…

Filed under Education, Government, medicine, News by on . Comment#

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First, let us establish who Callista Gingrich is.  She is the current wife of Newt Gingrich, which news reporting at least suggests is a temporary employment. She is a former Washington intern who has created documentaries and media stuff with her husband.

He has a history of finding his next wife before finishing with the last, so if she were my buddy I would tell her that I hope she has a good prenup — or maybe she wants a postnup.

This being said, I agree with this woman on the thesis of this article — assuming she actually wrote it. Often, people in the public eye let someone else “do the paperwork” when they blog, write essays, etc. Ms. Newt says that today’s young kids have an appalling lack of knowledge about the basics of the history of this country, such as why the pilgrims came or who George Washington was. Read more on Knowledge Of History Means National Pride…

Filed under medicine, News, Science by on . Comment#

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This story does not start with “I was minding my own business, surfing the internet.”

I was seeing a deeply suffering patient with terminal cancer and I was sneezing.  I have a bunch of seasonal allergies and I treat them naturally with Quercetin and related compounds, a bioflavonoid, unpatentable, because I would have to eat a lot of oranges to get enough.  Still, I will admit to the occasional sneeze, followed by the use of a tissue.  She stroked my arm.  “I hope you take good care of yourself, you are such a sweet lady.  Maybe you need some Tamiflu or something.”  I promised her I would look into it, taking her concern for my well being as a sign that she liked me.  When people like me that much, it gratifies me and tells me I am doing the job of doctor pretty well, or at least better than the generally non-emotional most, and I am happy.  Out of sheer curiosity, I actually checked into Tamiflu. Read more on Why I Have Not and Will Not Take Tamiflu…

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I kind of like ABC news, since they at least reported the news about azithromycin and a lot of other folks didn’t.

For more information, here is the original article, and here is the FDA safety announcement (this link leads to a PDF which will load in a separate window, but you must have the Adobe Acrobat reader – free – installed). Read more on Azithromycin Scare…

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I’ve got my outrage in motion and I’m blowing the whistle on one of the dirtiest tricks the big pharmaceutical companies play on us.

They have a technique called “Seeding Trials” that masquerade as drug testing (clinical trials) but are really nothing more than marketing surveys they can use to get around government regulations about promoting their drugs for alternative uses (also know as “off-label” uses).

But I’m printing this news in my private newsletter — not in my public blog.

The good news, you can read this for free.  All you need to do is sign up for my free newsletter (that means “free of charge” as well as “Spam-Free”).

Just type your name and email address in that little box in the upper right hand corner of this page to opt-in.  Of course, you can opt-out at any time also.

But I’m hoping that you find me so fascinating that you will continue to read.

The news I print in this blog is pretty general and the items in the newsletter are more personal and specific.

I think you will find it fascinating to see into the world of medicine, science, politics, government and even culture.

The newsletter will go out by email in a day or two … so please sign on now and take this journey with me.  I promise to make it worth your time.

Take care and be happy!

Dr. G

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Lady Gaga had to cancel some shows because she has Synovitis. Can you get that from wearing raw meat?  Just checkin’.  Actually, I know a little something about this. Synovitis, I mean.  Not the wearing meat part; I much prefer to eat mine.

Go back to me at 18.  Yes, I know it was a long time ago.  But there are some things you do not forget, like my first days in the emergency room at the ancient and venerated Massachusetts General Hospital.  It had been open since 1811.  I read the log; the first patient was a French sailor — ships could dock at the front door, then — with what was politely referred to as a “social disease.”  It was a work-study job assigned to me as an undergraduate, allegedly pre-med, at the sprawling Boston University. They laughed when I said I was going to be a doctor. I took people’s wallets from their pockets, looking for identification and insurance cards and I was good at that nefarious profession.  I loved the moments when it was quiet up front and I could sneak back to an operating or treatment room, stealing a generally useless tidbit of medical knowledge.  Such tidbits seemed so precious then. I remember sneaking back to the cast room when a handsome, muscled, orthopedic surgeon was casting a leg.  He was laughing at me, like everyone else.  He told me to ask him questions. The lady with fake blond hair, whom he was casting, was laughing, too.  “Go ahead, honey.  Ask him questions.” I asked him, I guess she hurt her knee.  “How do you know how high up and how low down to build the cast?”  Above and below the injury.  Knees were kind of a mess, but you always worried about the articulations above and below.  The orthopedist was not particularly articulate.  I started thinking that any idiot could be one, and medical school should not be that hard to get into. I thanked him and turned to leave when he hit me with something I have never forgotten.  “Casts are easy.  Broken bones are easy.  The tough stuff is soft tissue.  Nobody knows a damned thing about soft tissue injuries.  They act like they do, but they don’t.”  I repeated my thanks, and felt bad that I had to slip back to the front desk and the business of who people were and who paid for all this.  Read more on Lady Gaga’s Synovitis…

Filed under Diagnosis, medicine, News by on . Comment#

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You know those old traveling medicine shows from the 1800s?  Royal Jelly is kind of like that.

Usually this stuff finds me when I’m minding my own business and surfing the net or scanning a book.  This time, I was in front of a TV camera with an interviewer and I had already told him in private conversation, not once but twice, I was no believer in Royal Jelly. I suggested that this was not a direction to pursue with me.  He did. Read more on Royal Jelly Ain’t That Cool…

Filed under medicine, News, Research by on . Comment#

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The first time I heard of the fruit mangosteen, I thought it was just a Jewish mango. Turns out it’s Southeast Asian and in no way Jewish.  Makes sense; I mean, how do you circumcise a fruit?  Let alone teach it to read the holy books.

The second time I heard of it, I was trying to help a manic-depressive who went manic on it.  A degree professional had suddenly thrown angry tantrums, put his hand and other weapons through nearby walls, and tried to burn down the apartment building where his woman-friend lived.  He succeeded in burning down part of it. It all happened within a few hours of him ingesting mangosteen.  I told him to stop the damned mangosteen.  I remember seeing him through bars, and I doubted he could get any mangosteen in there, anyway.  But he would not hear ill of his dear mangosteen.  It was a multi-level-marketing product and he seemed to believe in it for that reason, despite some factors I was trying to introduce.  Things like biochemical truth, behavioral pharmacology, and my decades of medical practice experience — as opposed to his multi-level marketing experience.  His family stopped paying me as an expert.  I think they all sold mangosteen. Read more on Utah, Mangosteen, and Bad Stuff…