Michael Jackson

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Here are some phrases that you might not expect to hear sweet, friendly Dr. G use very often:

“No, there is no way in hell I am going to renew that prescription as written.”

“Read my lips.  No more oxycodone.  We gotta get you into a rehab, sweetie.”

“Sure, you can see another doctor.  I don’t know how long it will take to get an appointment.  If I am your doctor, you go on a tapering schedule.  Today.”

“If I did what you want, I could kiss my license goodbye.  I am not prescribing outside my specialty and certainly not this crap.  Yes it is crap.  I am sorry you don’t like how I talk, but it is crap.  I can start getting you off it.”

These are all things I have actually said.  Usually loud, yelling over the patient. Read more on Pill Mills Are Death Traps — Marginally Legal…

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Am I a Brit-snob?  Never thought I was, but maybe I am turning into one. Or maybe it is because The Daily Mail has more detail about the trial of Michael Jackson’s doctor — and better pictures. Whatever.  The truth of the matter is that when the story about Michael Jackson’s death first came out, I had to look up the generic name of Propofol, because I have never used it.  I mean, why would I be hanging around with general anesthesia?  For that matter, why would a cardiologist be hanging around with general anesthesia?? Money alone?  Possible, I do not know what this guy’s finances were like. But I have never personally known or heard of a starving cardiologist — although I suspect that those who do insurance only no co-pay may be closer to it than they want to admit.  But I suspect this guy was not one of those. “Rescuer?”  Perhaps.  Although I cannot quite see Michael Jackson as a “victim” needing saving. Someone basking in the glare of celebrity?  More likely.  A rich person’s doctor, maybe — a doctor wanting to work with famous people. I have felt the pull of that one myself.  But I ran like crazy when I figured out these folks are more interested in getting the prescriptions they want – usually recreationally — rather than in getting something that might actually help any actual medical problem they might have. “Celebrity” may be a new kind of pathology, where people imagine themselves as uber-people who have more rights than other people, and who can buy pretty much anything they want.  Some doctors are easier to buy than others –otherwise how could tobacco companies present medical experts who say smoking won’t harm you? Who can put a price on credentials, or even signatures?  I think this man sold it all. Sure, The Mail has verified — other stories, other places, too — that his purchase of large amounts of propofol was legal, and that his credentials were real. This is not substitute for “ethics,” which people often say they will teach in medical school, but which are, basically, impossible to teach. How can you teach something that life-experience will be the only thing to test you on? Ethics are learned young, far before medical school, and internalized. Read more on Celebrity Pathology Requires Ethics To Treat…

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